Tag Archives: 1715 Fleet

Red Kettle-donated gold shipwreck coin to be auctioned

13 Apr

A 300-year-old Spanish colonial gold coin recovered from a 1715 Plate Fleet shipwreck and donated during the Salvation Army’s 2016 Holiday Red Kettle campaign will be auctioned on May 3, 2017.

46

The Bogota cob 1 escudo recovered from the 1715 Fleet and donated to the Salvation Army in December of 2016.

The coin will appear as lot 46 in Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC’s Treasure, World, U.S. Coin and Paper Money Auction #21, held May 3-4 online at auction.sedwickcoins.com. The lot is estimated at $2,000 to $3,000. The Salvation Army will receive the full final hammer price from the sale.

Also included with the coin is a letter on its provenance from Lt. Jonathan Needham, corps officer of the Salvation Army of Vero Beach, as well as the case the coin was donated in.

The gold escudo was anonymously handed to volunteer bell ringer Jim Bessey on Dec. 23, 2016 outside of a Sebastian, Fla. Walmart store. The donation made national news as one of the more interesting pieces given to the Salvation Army during the holiday season.

The donated coin was minted at the Spanish colonial mint in Bogota, Colombia sometime between 1700 and 1715 as a posthumous issue of King Charles II (1661-1700).

In 1715, the escudo, along with many others, was shipped aboard the 1715 Plate Fleet, one of the largest treasure fleets of its time. Several ships from the fleet sank during a storm off the east coast of Florida. Much of the treasure remained on the ocean floor until modern day salvage operations recovered many coins and artifacts, which are in demand on the collectibles market.

Bidders can register for the auction at auction.sedwickcoins.com. The auction catalog is available for ordering at www.sedwickcoins.com. For more details, please contact Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC at office@sedwickcoins.com.

Gallery

What You Can’t Live Without in Treasure Auction #20 (part four)

8 Nov

We’re into the home stretch with only 4 days to go until the auction! We hope you have been bidding and will join us for the live portion.

Below are some of the most important artifacts in the auction, and while most of these items will come up at the end of the auction, it’s definitely a case of “last but not least.” Coins–as well as all shipwreck treasure–are our business, and you can be confident that we know what we’re talking about in our descriptions.

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Lot 473, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

Why have one coin when you can have several? The above is a large clump of 20+ Mexican cob 8 reales, two in front dated 1714. It’s a very impressive display that stands up well, also a very rare item these days and was recovered from the Spanish 1715 Fleet off the east coast of Florida.

 

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Lot 1636, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

You could eat off the above plate today because it’s in such good condition. It’s marked with a tax stamp and LDo.IVo. / RAMYREZ under rim. More important, the underside of the rim bears most of a castles-and-lions circular tax stamp and a stamping in tiny letters that exactly matches lots 41-43 of the Christie’s 1988 Atocha auction, in which that mark was described as an “owner’s stamp.” It is clearly part of a set with this bigger basin; those three lots were only 8-7/8″ in diameter and described as “dinner plates.” They fetched some of the highest prices realized among the silver plates in that sale, upwards of $6000 hammer, but not even close to the price realized for the only large basin (like what we are offering here but slightly bigger), lot 47, which hammered at $22,000!

 

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Lot 1642, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

The above is a complete gold plain-loop chain, 34.55 grams, from the “Tricentennial Treasure” find of 2015. There are hundreds of tiny plain links in a tight chain (easily kinked) that is remarkable for being unbroken and complete, eminently wearable and attractive despite its simplicity, also one of the first artifacts from the famous “Tricentennial Treasure” to be offered for sale. From the 1715 Fleet (Douglass Beach site).

 

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Lot 1654, Sedwick Treasure Auction #20

What’s an auction with out a cannon? The above Danish naval “4-pounder” bronze howitzer from the late 1700s  is  believed to have been from military and naval stores captured by the British during the Battle of Copenhagen in 1807. Sent to England, these items were used by English forces during the Napoleonic Wars and in America and Canada during the War of 1812. Some ended up in American service due to capture or purchase. The bronze barrel has a chambered bore (which most howitzers have), a designated area for the powder charge, turned decorations and cast with bronze pointing tiller cascabel ending on a rounded ball end. This cannon was made for use as a swivel gun but is now mounted on a mahogany naval deck carriage (complete and serviceable with working elevation screw and wheels) with correct brass and iron mounts and four wheels from the early 19th century (possibly exact replacements made later). The barrel is in excellent condition with minor surface wear and excellent light-brown patina.

Once again, we hope you all your bids are winning bids!

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