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Treasure, World, U.S. Coin and Paper Money Auction 30

31 Oct

Live In-Person & on the Internet, Thursday-Friday & Monday, November 4-5 & 8

We’re excited to host our first live floor auction since the beginning of the pandemic over a year and a half ago. While our past three online-only sales were immensely successful and record-breaking, we missed visiting with the many bidders that attend our live floor auctions. There’s something to be said about bidding on and seeing these treasures in person, which is why we’re grateful to be at this point.

Session I begins with Gold Cobs, which hosts a number of choice 1715 Fleet coins including a 1711 J Mexico cob 8 escudo Royal (lot 16), an extremely rare 1714 Mexico cob 8 escudos struck with a Royal obverse die (lot 18), one of the nicest 1712 Lima 8 escudos we’ve ever handled (lot 29), and a fascinating 1702 Bogotá cob 2 escudos with the date rendered as “2071” reading outward (lot 63). Notable non-wreck gold cobs in this section include a 1698/7 M Seville 8 escudos plated in both Calicó and Tauler reference works (lot 14), plus a rare and unlisted 1751 S Bogotá cob 8 escudos (lot 58). The latter is pedigreed to the featured Fernandina Collection, a curated group of some very high grade and rare gold cobs, both wreck and non-wreck, that will no doubt attract much attention.


The Shipwreck Ingots section is strongly influenced by lots from the Atocha (1622) due to next year’s 400th anniversary of the sinking. We feature one impressive gold “finger” bar (lot 67) from the wreck alongside a total of five large silver ingots (lots 71-75). Coins from the Atocha feature prominently in Shipwreck Coins with some 70+ lots up for bidding, including a very rare Lima cob 2 reales Philip II assayer X (lot 87). Other lots of note include coins from the Capitana (1654) and Maravillas (1656) wrecks pedigreed to the Mastalir Collection of Countermarked Potosí cobs, a wide selection of Dutch portrait and rider ducatoons from the Akerendam (1725)(lots 288-332), our first offering of an NGC-graded Mexico cob 8 reales from the pirate ship Whydah (1717)(lot 280), and an assortment of world and US gold coins salvaged from the popular SS Central America (1857)(lots 396-406).


In Mexico Silver Cobs, we offer several extremely rare cob 8 reales Royals like a 1613 F (lot 424), a 1706 J (lot 430), and a 1715 J (lot 432) in addition to a desirable 1728/6/5 D pedigreed to the Rooswijk (1739). Lima Silver Cobs hosts the quite rare 1686 R Lima cob 8 reales Royal (Lot 490) in addition to several other rare types. Many more rare Royals can be found in the Potosí Silver Cobs section including a very difficult to acquire 1656 E Potosí cob 8 reales Royal (lot 635). Bidders’ hearts will be beating strongly for lots 741 and 808 – the finest and only graded 1696 VR cob 4 reales and 1734 E cob 1 real Hearts. Two key collections within this session are the Barry Stallard Research Collection of Early Lima, La Plata and Potosí Cobs (see lot 505 for the immensely rare La Plata piece) and the Jorge Ugaz Collection of Potosí Cob 8 and 4 Reales.


On the second day of the auction, the wide selection found in World Coins should draw spirited bidding from all over the world. Such rarities there include a fresh-to-the-market Japanese proof 20 sen dated Meiji year 13 (1880)(lot 1173), two Segovia-minted rarities – a gold 4 excelentes of Ferdinand-Isabel (lot 1276) and a massive 50 reales cincuentín dated 1620 (only our second offering of this rare denomination!) (lot 1315), and the finest NGC-graded 1745 MF Mexico pillar 8 reales (lot 1184). Also an special selection of gold Chilean coins recovered from La Luz wreck (854-865). The presence of a 1621 A Cartagena (Colombia) cob 8 reales from the “Dry Tortugas wreck” (1622) as lot 885 is especially fitting as this year is the 400th anniversary of the striking of these first coins from the mint in Cartagena – an event we will be celebrating in December while attending the Cartagena Numismatic Congress.


We are very pleased to offer several collections within this session: the exclusive J.O.B. Collection of Seville Gold Coins (lots 1251-1275) packed with many finest and only known graded pieces, the Tamarindo Collection of Costa Rican Error Coins and Paper Money, and Part II of the Antigua Collection of Guatemalan Cobs.


One further collection to note is the John Adams Collection of Admiral Vernon Medals in Medals and Decorations. His feature article preceding the lots explains his personal collecting journey how this top-notch collection came to be.


U.S. Coins and Paper Money hosts some branch-mint gold coins from Dahlonega (lot 1411) and Charlotte (lot 1415) plus some popular early American currency like the 1798 Draped Bust silver dollar (lot 1419), the 1794 Flowing Hair large cent (lot 1434), and the grade-rarity 1777-dated South Carolina $20 colonial note (1451). World Paper Money contains some desirable type notes such as the Argentina 1 peso remainder of 1827-9 with portraits of Washington and Bolívar (lot 1456), the rare Cartagena (Colombia) Estado Soberano de Bolívar 10 pesos note of 1885 (lot 1459), and the spectacular Banco Internacional de Costa Rica 100 colones error note dated to the year “2931” (lot 1464).


Following an assortment of popular Greek, Roman, and Byzantine coinage designs in Ancient Coins, the Coin Jewelry section offers a wealth of mounted Atocha (1622) silver coins (lots 1540-1568) plus a visually impressive 1714 J Mexico gold cob 8 escudos in a special 1715 Fleet pendant setting (lot 1537).


Shipwreck Artifacts has many interesting salvaged items such as a pocket sundial from the HMS Winchester (1695), previously seen in a 1977 issue of National Geographic magazine (lot 1589), as well as an ornate gold toothpick from the 1715 Fleet (lot 1590). Finally, some notable lots in Non-Wreck Artifacts include an arsenal of flintlock pistols (lots 1605-1610) plus a long Spanish miquelet officer’s musket (lot 1604). The following Monday, we end the auction with an Express session with 400+ lots of lower priced coins, currency, and artifacts.


We wish you the best of luck in bidding, whether online or in person, with special thanks to all of our consignors!

The Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC team:
Daniel Sedwick, Agustín (Augi) García-Barneche, Cori Sedwick Downing, Connor Falk

400-year-old twist of fate uniting Cartagena, Colombia, and Florida Keys history to be celebrated

15 Sep

When the primary cultural deposit – the motherlode – of the 1622 fleet galleon Nuestra Señora de Atocha was discovered by divers working for treasure hunter Mel Fisher near Key West, Florida in 1985, among its riches was a vast cargo of silver coins the likes of which had never been seen before. The discovery also delivered a bombshell surprise of evidence for historians: confirmation that hand-struck silver coins were produced in the Nuevo Reino de Granada – today’s Colombia – as early as 1621, a fact that some had suspected, but none had proof to substantiate.

This year, from December 1 to December 5, 2021, 400 years after the conflict-ridden establishment of minting houses in both Cartagena and Santa Fe de Bogota, coin experts and history enthusiasts from all over the world – including six from Florida – will gather in Colombia’s romantic sea-port city for “Cartagena MMXXI – the 3rd International Convention of Historians and Numismatists” where they will examine and celebrate this fascinating point in time along with other key moments in numismatic history.

Noted Colombian historian, numismatist and San José shipwreck expert Jorge Becerra de Leon, left, and historic research expert/numismatist Jorge Proctor, in period costume, address an audience at a previous conference. Both will be featured speakers at Cartagena MMXXI – the 3rd International Convention of Historians and Numismatists, taking place December 1-5, 2021, in Cartagena, Colombia. (Photo by Carol Tedesco)

Open to the public, the convention features presentations by some of the world’s leading experts, including Florida’s Jorge Proctor of Pompano Beach, an archival research expert, numismatist and head of the convention’s academic committee; noted marine archaeologist, anthropologist, author and retired professor Dr. R. Duncan Mathewson III of Little Torch Key, who led the Atocha’s archaeological recovery process; Orlando-based professional numismatist and convention V.P. of North American relations, Augi Garcia; Orlando-based professional numismatist and author Daniel Frank Sedwick, Tampa-based professional numismatist Colin M. Blyth, and Key West and Gainesville-based shipwreck coin curation expert, author and International Conventions founding member Carol Tedesco.

Though researchers reported that coins were minted in Colombia as early as 1622, until the discovery of the Atocha, none dated earlier than 1625 were known to exist. Archival records documented that in 1620 a military engineer by the name of Don Alonso Turrillo de Yebra had been authorized by King Philip III of Spain to establish a mint in what was then known as the Nuevo Reino de Granada – the New Kingdom of Granada. Documents also revealed that the undertaking, which included a mint in Santa Fe de Bogota and an ancillary one in Cartagena, was fraught with beauracratic complications and delays. Nonetheless, Turrillo persisted, and in a letter to the King he confirms that at some point prior to the sailing of the 1622 fleet he had indeed struck coins, of “much more perfection than that which is styled in some of the other mints,” and he lamented that some of these “were on one of the galleons which were flooded.” Yet the question remained, were coins also struck in Nuevo Reino de Granada in 1621 as some documents seemed to imply? The answer was eventually revealed among recoveries from the Atocha and another ship of the fleet.

Reverse and obverse sides of a partially dated 1621 silver coin, struck at the Cartagena, Colombia mint that went down on the galleon Atocha near Key West, Florida in 1622, and is one of a small group of coins that altered the known numismatic history of Colombia. A December 1-5, 2021 event in Cartagena will celebrate the 400 year anniversary of the opening of that mint. Events recognizing the 400 year anniversary of the Atocha’s sinking will take place in Key West in 2022. (Photo provided by Bill Pearson)

A Cartagena MMXXI conference presentation by Turrillo authority Proctor, titled “Alonso Turrillo – hero or villain?” will address key questions as well as examine some of the shenanigans undertaken over the course of years by the wiley and resourceful “entrepreneur.” Other notable experts from Colombia, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Panama, Puerto Rico, Spain, the U.S., and Venezuela will offer a combination of live and virtual presentations as well as book presentations on a variety of historic numismatic themes.

Of particular interest to sunken shipwreck historians and enthusiasts will be updates and discussions on Colombia’s famous San José shipwreck, which was sunk by British Naval forces in 1708, taking hundreds of people and a cargo of New World produced wealth estimated in the billions to a resting place in nearly 2000 feet/600 meters of sea water from Cartagena. Under discussion will be prospects for recovery of the vessel, and establishment of a museum to house and display its artifacts.

For registration and other conference information, including a gala, ceremonies, social events, and a commercial numismatic component for collectors and sellers, visit cartagena2021.com. The website is in Spanish but offers an English translation feature and English language registration guide. English/Spanish translation for all presentations will be provided. Covid-19 safety protocols will be in place for the duration of the conference; scheduling may be subject to change. Attendees are encouraged to check the website regularly for updates. For in-person guests and participants, facemasks and proof of vaccination will be required, and social distancing will be observed.

A painting by Samuel Scott (1702-1772) depicts the destruction in 1708 of the treasure galleon San José off the coast of Cartagena, Colombia. Prospects for recovery of the vessel and establishment of a museum to house and display its artifacts is to be one of the topics under discussion at Cartagena MMXXI – the 3rd International Convention of Historians and Numismatists. (Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

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Press contact: Augi Garcia / prensa@cartagena2020.com

Rare world, shipwreck coins set record Sedwick Auction

26 May

Strong bids for rare world and shipwreck coins surpassed $4.07 million in Daniel Frank Sedwick’s May 7, 8, & 10 Treasure Auction 29. This is a new record for the auction firm and an indicator of a robust market for collectible coins and currency.

The top selling coin in the sale was the single finest Mexico City-struck cob 8 reales Royal dated 1730 that realized $102,000 on a pre-sale estimate of $35,000 and up. A numismatic rarity, the coin has an overdate 1730/28/5 plus the king’s name and ordinal reworked with PHILIPPVS V over LVDOVICS I. It was graded by NGC as AU 58 which is rare among all Spanish colonial Royals as almost all known examples were holed and some even gilded shortly after minting.

The top gold coin sold was a Bogota, Colombia gold 4 escudos dated 1826JF graded NGC MS 64 that realized $72,000. It boasts a pedigree to the Esmeralda Collection, a curated group of some of the finest early post-independence Colombian gold and silver coins, that was sold in the auction along with special NGC labels. This 1826JF 4 escudos also held pedigrees to the famous R.L. Lissner and Eliasberg collections as well.

The Esmeralda Collection also contained the single finest graded “Libertad Americana” Bogota, Colombia silver 8 reales dated 1819JF graded NGC MS 64. This scarce and desirable piece is the first “crown” coin of independent Colombia. A fight amongst several bidders ended with the coin selling for $57,000 on an estimate of $25,000 and up.

“Results for Latin American coins were outstanding and record-breaking,” said Daniel Frank Sedwick, president and founder of the company, “Given low mintages and survival rates, I believe collectors realize that their opportunity to own some of the finest examples may only come that one time during our auction – and they are bidding accordingly.”

It was not just coins that ruled the auction. A 22-1/4 karat Colombian gold bar weighing 358 grams recovered in 1985 by salvager Mel Fisher from the wreck of the Spanish galleon Atocha realized over double its start price to sell for $66,000. A similarly rare and desirable Seville, Spain gold cob 2 escudos graded PCGS AU 58 from the Atocha sold for $39,000 on a $10,000 to $15,000 estimate.

Other top lots in the sale include:

–          A Mexico City, Mexico, silver cob 8 reales Royal dated 1607F graded NGC XF details / holed, ex-Rudman, sold for $54,000.

–          A Segovia, Spain gold milled 8 escudos dated 1721/19F graded NGC AU 58+ and the finest known in the NGC census sold for $54,000.

–          A Mexico City cob 8 reales Royal dated 1714J and graded NGC AU details / environmental damage plus the distinction as the only known Royal 8 reales recovered from the 1715 Fleet sold for $46,500.

–          A Cuzco, Peru, gold cob 1 escudo, dated 1698M and graded NGC AU 58 sold for $45,000.

–          A Potosi, Bolivia, silver cob 2 reales, dated 1733E, with a unique heart design as made, sold for $36,000.

–          A Mexico City, gold cob 8 escudos, dated 1714J, graded NGC MS 62 recovered from a 1715 Fleet shipwreck, ex-Ullian, sold for $34,800.

–          A Lima, Peru, gold cob 8 escudos, dated 1712M, graded NGC MS 62 recovered from a 1715 Fleet shipwreck, sold for $31,200.

–          A Quito, Ecuador, silver 4 reales dated 1844MV-A graded NGC MS 65, finest known in the NGC census, ex-Lissner, sold for $31,200.

–          A United States silver Draped Bust dollar dated 1796 with small date and large letters (Bolender-4) graded NGC VF 30 sold for $7,200.

The auction firm’s next sale will be the Nov. 3-5, 2021 Treasure Auction 30 held live online and in person in Orlando, Florida. Consignments are now being accepted for that auction through August 14th; interested consignors should email the company at office@sedwickcoins.com or call 407.975.3325.

We can travel to you to you or you can consign in person at these upcoming Coin Shows:

  • July 7-10, 2021 FUN Summer Coin Show – Orlando, Florida
  • August 10-14, 2021 ANA World’s Fair of Money, Rosemont, Illinois.

NOW ONLINE! Sedwick’s May 7 – 8 & 10 Treasure Auction 29

21 Apr



Treasure, World, U.S. Coin and Paper Money Auction 29 Live on the Internet, Friday-Saturday, May 7-8 and Monday, May 10

After several months of working with consignors to bring you the best fresh material at realistic levels, we are proud and privileged to present to you our 29th auction. Some would say it is our best ever! Here are some highlights to watch for:

In Gold Cobs, dominated by 1715-Fleet gems as always, we offer a choice (MS 63) Cuzco 2 escudos (lot 36) as well as a very rarely seen Cuzco 1 escudo (lot 37), both dated 1698 for the one year they were made.

In Shipwreck Ingots you will find THREE gold bars from the Atocha (lots 51-53), in addition to silver ingots from the “Tumbaga wreck” (ca. 1528), Atocha (1622) and Maravillas (1656), plus a very rare large ingot (lot 61) from the Santa Margarita (1622) found in 1980. Also be sure to check out the large natural gold specimens dubbed “Golden Coral” (lot 55) and “Golden Fist” (lot 56), from Alaska and California respectively.

In Shipwreck Coins be sure to watch for a PCGS-certified gold 2 escudos (lot 68) from the Atocha, as well as strong selections of choice Concepción (1641), Capitana (1654), 1715 Fleet and Rooswijk (1739) coins. Three $20 “double eagles” from the “Fort Capron Treasure,” S.S. Central America (1857) and S.S. Brother Jonathan (1865), lots 249-251, are worth noting as well.

In Mexico Silver Cobs we feature several Royals (galanos) from the Isaac Rudman Numismatic Cabinet, most notably a 1607 8 reales (lot 279), a unique and choice (unholed AU 58) 1730/28/5 8 reales (lot 287). Shipwreck enthusiasts will be keen to watch lot 285 (dated 1714), the only NGC-certified 8 reales Royal from the 1715 Fleet.
In Lima Silver Cobs and Potosí Silver Cobs we proudly present the Arturo Rosenheim Collection and several great 8 reales Royals, including: Lima 1689 (lot 341) and 1695 (lot 348); Potosí 1630 (lot 423) and 1652 Type V Transitional (lot 449), plus a non-holed, NGC-certified AU 53 1742 (lot 539). We finish Potosí with a unique 2 reales Heart of 1733 assayer E (lot 623).

All other cobs (Colombia, Guatemala, Panama and Spain) are now in the  World Coins section to accommodate several more important collections, namely the Esmeralda Collection of Gran ColombiaCoinage (1819-1830); Part II of theNueva Granada Collection of Colombian Rarities; and Part I of the Antiqua Collection of Guatemalan Cobs. In Colombia we feature several “finest knowns,” including: 4 escudos 1826 (lot 805); “Libertad Americana” 8 reales 1819 (lot 832); and República de Colombia / Nueva Granada mule 8 reales 1820 (lot 834); in addition to many important patterns and other rarities. Also look for trophies in Cuba (lot 937, an MS 70 piefort 100 pesos 1990), Ecuador (lot 956, an NGC MS 65 4 reales of 1844), Guatemala (lot 1037, a gold proof 10 pesos essai of 1894) and Mexico (lot 1042, an NGC-finest 8 escudos of 1750, and lot 1073, an NGC-finest Durango “hookneck” 8 reales of 1824). Finally be sure to witness our largest-to-date selection of Spanish gold coins, featuring this auction’s “Best in Show” Segovia milled 8 escudos 1721/19 (lot 1150).

In Medals and Decorations we feature the latest installment in Selections from the John Adams Collection of Admiral Vernon Medals. Next, in U.S. Coins and Paper Money you will find an NGC VF 30 Draped Bust dollar 1796 (lot 1263). World Paper Money features the first-known República de Costa Rica 100 and 50 colones remainders from the 1917 issuance (lots 1303 and 1304), plus the popular Banco Internacional “La Mandolina” 50 colones of 1916 (lot 1302), as well as a major Guatemalan rarity: the PMG-finest 1934-dated 10 quetzales from the General Orellana series in Choice UNC 63 (lot 1314).

We round out the auction with Ancient Coins and Coin Jewelry, followed by the usual great selection of artifacts. Shipwreck Artifacts features long gold chains from the Atocha (lot 1378) and 1715 Fleet (lot 1394), and in Non-Wreck Artifacts we present all kinds of fossils and firearms. The coveted “final lot” position in the Documents section (lot 1443) goes to an original 1912 newspaper covering the Titanic disaster just five days after the sinking.

After a Sunday to regroup, we finish the auction with a video-off Express session on Monday for all your lower-priced needs from every section. Enjoy!

Here’s wishing everyone good health and happy bidding, and to all our consignors we say many thanks!

Daniel Frank Sedwick, LLC / Licensed Florida Auctioneer #AU3635, AB2592 (since 2007)
P.O. BOX 1964 | Winter Park, Florida 32790 | Phone: 407.975.3325 | Fax: 407.975.3327

A Sneak Peek at Sedwick’s May 7-8 Treasure Auction 29

19 Feb

We’ve received a lot of interest in our upcoming May 7-8 Treasure Auction 29 – and rightfully so. The numismatic market is still very hot and this has inspired several top Latin American collections to come to the auction block. So, we’re offering here a sneak peek of what’s coming up in our next sale!

Is there still time to consign? Yes, we’re still accepting consignments of select items – shipwreck gold coins, shipwreck gold and silver ingots, rare world gold and silver coins, better Latin American paper money, and US paper money (chiefly colonial and Continental Currency). But contact us soon as our consignment period closes Feb. 28!

The Esmeralda Collection features some of the finest examples of coinage, both gold and silver, to be struck by Gran Colombia from 1819 to 1830. In this period, wholly original and uniquely Latin American escudos and reales designs were created as the region left its Spanish colonial coinage behind.

There is no greater example of this liberation in coinage design than the “Libertad Americana” design, of which the collection features the finest known Bogota 1819JF silver 8 reales example. In fact, we like this coin design so much that the bust will feature prominently on a special holder label made by us and NGC specifically for the Esmeralda Collection.

Other key coins in the collection include a Bogota 1826JF gold 4 escudos graded NGC MS 64 pedigreed to the Louis Eliasberg and Richard Lissner Collections as well as a Bogota 1819JF silver 2 reales struck over a Cartagena imitation cob plated in Emilio Restrepo’s Coins of Colombia (2012). Indeed, many of the coins in this collection hold pedigrees to prestigious coin collections. 

In our second offering of coins from the Nueva Granada Collection, bidders will find examples of rare Spanish colonial Colombian minors and proclamation medals as well as later date patterns and trial strikes. Both the quality and rarity of coins in this selection are sure to excite collectors as they did during the first part of this extensive Colombian collection. 

This nearly complete collection will be one of the largest groups of Guatemalan cobs to hit the market in recent time. This first part will feature Guatemalan 8 and 4 reales, including rarities like an unholed 1733J 8 reales (only about 4-5 examples are known on the market).

Arturo Rosenheim was a collector of Spanish colonial cob coinage and a good client of ours. He attempted the difficult task of assembling all the possible dates of Lima 8 reales cobs and put together an impressive run. 


Other collections to watch for in the sale include:
– Selections from the John Adams Collection of Admiral Vernon Medals
– Mexican Silver Cobs from the Isaac Rudman Numismatic Cabinet
– A Fine Collection of Latin American Crown Coinage


The auction catalog will be available online around the first week of April with printed catalogs available for order shortly thereafter. For more details, please visit our website at sedwickcoins.com.

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